Acupuncture for Stroke Patients By Anthony Cerabino

Anthony Cerabino Acupuncture

Acupuncture for Stroke Patients

Recently, I attended an Acupuncture workshop/seminar protocol called, Xing Nao Kai Qiao, for victims of stroke.  This seminar presented a stroke protocol that was demonstrated in the film documentary “9000 Needles”. The story portrays a remarkable recovery (not a full recovery) by the patient Devon Dearth and produced by his brother Doug Dearth. This movie is a MUST SEE for all those patients and families who are struggling with neurological disorders.

 

I have been treating Barbara, a stroke patient for the past two months and getting gradual improvement. Her symptoms have affected her right arm and leg with some speech difficulties. The  symptoms that have changed since being treated with Acupuncture  to the arm and leg are; less pins and needles, less hypersensitivity to touch, infrequent spasms, warmer temperature on both the effected arm and leg and most recently a neurological connection to the ankle, toes and foot on the affected side that was not established prior to treatment. The patient can now move her toes slightly!! This was a remarkable improvement within the past two weeks.

 

Barbara did not start her Acupuncture treatments until 17 months after the stroke. Despite her delay in Acupuncture treatments, Barbara is getting results. For better results, Acupuncture should be administered without too much delay after the traumatic episode when the patient has regained some strength and composure .  A minimum of two treatments per week is essential. Patients in China will be treated in the hospital everyday with Acupuncture and adjunct modalities. In addition to my Acupuncture and Massage therapy treatments, Barbara is taking a Chinese Herbal Formula. The herbal prescription has been written by Tom Nash of Acupuncture Associates in Hicksville. The function of the herbal formula is to nourish blood, stop pain (which is commonly described by the pins and needles that has the feeling of “stinging nettles”) and move Qi (pronounced chee) and blood.

 

 

 

 

Barbara is also being treated at “New Beginnings”, a community center for brain injury rehabilitation. www.nbli.org. New Beginnings is a non-profit facility that incorporates Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Massage, Social Day Programs/Community Re-entry, Acupuncture and state-of-the-art machines to help with a wide array of daily life challenges for TBI (traumatic Brain Injuries).

 

Barbara is still under the supervision of her general practitioner. It was her neurologist that recommended being treated by Acupuncture. This is very promising for the medical community as a whole. Alternative healthcare is definitely starting to be embraced as an integral part of the health community in general.

 

One of my main goals with Barbara is to re-train and reconnect the brain to move her arm and legs more efficiently.  Scalp and Ear Acupuncture have been successful in addition to needling locally on the arms and legs to establish a connection to the brain. Ear and scalp acupuncture have been discovered within the past 60 years. Similar to allopathic medicine, Acupuncture is an evolving and ever growing healing art and science.

 

Barbara wanted everyone to know that most of the finer things in life take persistence, courage, faith and time. My treatment strategies with Barbara are consistent, incremental and caring.  I am excited to see Barbara’s progress and anxiously await the return of an independent lifestyle that she once knew.